May 20th, 2014

The Neurobiology of Trauma: Effective Use of Expressive Therapies with Children

6 - 8:00 PM ET

Featuring Daniel Sweeney, Ph.D.

Meg Meeker

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Webinar Presenter

 

Daniel Sweeney, Ph.D., LMFT, LPC, RPT-S, is a Professor of Counseling, Director of the Clinical Mental Health Counseling program, and Director of the NW Center for Play Therapy Studies at George Fox University in Portland, Oregon. He is a past board member and president of the Association for Play Therapy, and currently serves on the editorial board for the International Journal of Play Therapy. Dr. Sweeney maintains a small private practice, has extensive experience in working with children, couples, and families in a variety of settings, and has presented at numerous national and international conferences. He has published articles and book chapters on child counseling, play therapy issues, families and parenting. Dr. Sweeney is also author or co-author of several books, including Play Therapy Interventions with Children's Problems, Counseling Children Through the World of Play, Sandtray Therapy: A Practical Manual, The Handbook of Group Play Therapy, and Group Play Therapy: A Dynamic Approach. His books have been translated into Chinese, Korean and Russian. Dr. Sweeney and his wife live in Portland, Oregon, near their four adult children.

 

Abstract

Trauma (whether physical, sexual or emotional) often results in significant and negative psychological and neurobiological effects in the lives of child victims. These effects point to the need for therapeutic interventions that recognize these realities, extend safety, and honor the developmental level of children. Expressive therapies (such as art, play, drama, and sandtray therapy) have established developmental, psychological, and neurological benefit. Such healing approaches provide a therapeutic distance and kinesthetic nature that helps young clients process intra- and inter-personal pain and experience abreaction in a safe environment. This Webinar will explore recent research on the neurobiology of trauma and the use of expressive therapies.

Participants will:

  1. Explore the fundamental psychological and neurobiological effects of trauma on children
  2. Be able to articulate the rationale for using expressive therapies with traumatized children
  3. Identify several forms of expressive therapies for use with traumatized children
 
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June 24th, 2014

Restoring the Shattered Self: Symptom Stabilization for Complex Trauma Survivors

6 - 8:00 PM ET

Featuring Heather Davediuk Gingrich, Ph.D.

Meg Meeker

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Webinar Presenter

 

Heather Davediuk Gingrich, Ph.D., is a professor of counseling at Denver Seminary. Dr. Gingrich specializes in the treatment of complex trauma, including adult survivors of abuse, and has done research, writing, and clinical work in the area of dissociative disorders and trauma. She is a clinical member of the International Society for the Study of Trauma and Dissociation, the Rocky Mountain Trauma and Dissociation Society, and a professional affiliate of Division 56 (Trauma Psychology) of the American Psychological Association. Dr. Gingrich is an advisor for the Philippine Association of Christian Counselors and the Philippine Society for the Study for Trauma and Dissociation. During her 30 plus years in the counseling field, Dr. Gingrich has divided her time between clinical work and teaching. She has lived in Canada, Pakistan, the Philippines, and the United States. Dr. Gingrich earned a Ph.D. from the University of the Philippines, an M.A. from Wheaton College Graduate School, and a B.A. from Carleton University in Canada. She recently authored Restoring the Shattered Self: A Christian Counselor's Guide to Complex Trauma.

 

Abstract

Complex trauma survivors (e.g., adult survivors of child abuse, intimate partner violence, torture, kidnapping, sex trafficking victims) present unique counseling challenges. Intrusive, re-experiencing post-traumatic symptoms, such as flashbacks, nightmares, and terrifying emotions, can be overwhelming not only for counselees, but also for their counselors. The primary focus of this Webinar will be how such post-traumatic symptoms can be stabilized when dealing with complex, relational trauma, both in the initial phase of counseling as well as the trauma processing phase. The concept of dissociation will be examined in order to explain both the psychological mechanism by which such intrusive symptoms develop, and how they can be contained. How, and when, to use explicit spiritual resources will also be examined.

Participants will:

  1. Identify intrusive post-traumatic symptoms and explain how they develop
  2. Describe how to stabilize intrusive post-traumatic symptoms, including flashbacks, nightmares, terror, memory gaps, and physical pain
  3. Recognize how to use spiritual resources appropriately with complex trauma survivors
 
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July 29th, 2014

Playing with Violence: How the Virtual World Impacts Bullying and Aggressive Behaviors

6 - 8:00 PM ET

Featuring Tina Brookes, MSW, Ed.D.

Meg Meeker

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Webinar Presenter

 

Tina S. Brookes, LCSW, Ed.D., has specialized in critical incident crisis response for more than 20 years. She has offered support, training, and consultation to schools, law enforcement, fire, rescue, EMS, emergency management, hospitals, military, and various community agencies. She has presented at five World Congresses on critical incident crisis response, as well as numerous national, regional, and local conferences. Dr. Brookes was the Staff Development Coordinator on a Department of Education Emergency Response/Crisis Management (ERCM) for school grants and the director of a Readiness Emergency Management for Schools (REMS) Department of Education grant. She developed the ASSIST (Assisting Students and Staff in Stressful Times) protocol for schools. Dr. Brookes is a volunteer with the Billy Graham Rapid Response Team, most recently serving the communities of Aurora, CO and Newtown, CT. She is currently collaborating with Lt. Col. Dave Grossman and Commander Geoffrey Leggett on developing a one-day training on the impact of violent visual imagery on youth. Dr. Brookes attributes her inspiration to do this work to her faith, family and friends.

 

Abstract

Intense violence. Strong sexual content. Blood and gore. Use of drugs. The Entertainment Software Rating Board (ESRB) uses such phrases to describe the content of many action/adventure video games. With 97% of adolescents having played some type of video game, researchers are considering the potential negative impact of the virtual world on adolescent brain development. This Webinar will explore the violence marketed as "entertainment" through gaming, movies, and television to today's children and youth. Recent trends in bullying, aggressive behaviors and gun violence will be presented, as well as neurobiological findings on the impact of violent visual imagery. Dr. Brookes will outline practical steps for Christian counselors, educators, parents and youth workers in order to promote real-life relationships, quality family time, community service, physical wellness practices (including sports, exercise, and nutrition), and spiritual values (including respect, honor, kindness and love).

Participants will:

  1. Explore the negative neurobiological impact on today's youth of violent content marketed as "entertainment" through gaming, movies and television
  2. Identify how repeated exposure to violence in the virtual world often manifests itself in bullying, aggressive behaviors and gun violence
  3. Name and describe practical steps for facilitating pro-social behavior in youth and creating a culture of respect, honor and kindness
 
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